What happens to weekly payments if I get a new job and it doesn’t work out?

If you get another job, have completely recovered from your work injury and are no-longer in receipt of weekly payments of compensation, but you quit, are terminated or made redundant, you cannot now claim weekly payments of compensation from the workers compensation insurer, unless you have more than 20% permanent impairment.

However, if you get another job and are still in receipt of weekly payments of compensation because you do not have full work capacity, but through no fault of your own are terminated or made redundant, you need to urgently contact the insurer to have your weekly payments of compensation increased to the applicable rate. If you quit a job that has suitable employment for you, the insurer may decline to increase the weekly payments of compensation payable to you.

If you get another job and are still in receipt of weekly payments of compensation because you do not have full work capacity, but suffer an aggravation of your original injury or a new injury whilst at work, you may need to lodge a workers compensation claim on your new employer. You should attend upon your GP promptly and obtain a new WorkCover certificate.

If you get another job and are still in receipt of weekly payments of compensation because you do not have full work capacity, but you cannot keep up with the expected workload due to your injury, you need to attend upon your GP promptly and obtain a new WorkCover certificate which may include a decrease in your hours or restrictions on what you can do whilst at work. You then need to give a copy of this certificate to the workers compensation insurer and your new employer.

If your new employer was not aware of your previous work-related injury, this may come as a shock and they may suspend your employment until your capacity to do the job has returned. They may organise an appointment with a doctor of their choosing to ensure you are able to do the work, similar to a pre-employment medical. If you are unable to return to work with that employer, the insurer may assist you in finding a new job. Meantime, the insurer should increase your weekly payments of compensation to the applicable rate.

Remember, if you have more than 20% permanent impairment, you are not required to work a minimum of 15 hours and earn a minimum amount to receive weekly payments.

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